LUNAR Moondust: Good and Evil Finale

LUNAR Moondust: Good and Evil Finale

LUNAR Moondust: Good and Evil Finale
LUNAR Moondust: Good and Evil Finale LUNAR interns apply their creativity to explore perceptions of “good” and “evil” in objects What makes a product seem “good” or “evil”? Our industrial design interns recently completed their Moondust* project, spending the last several months exploring what makes objects seem “good” or, inversely, “evil.” If you’ve been following along, you’ll remember how Moondust works: we issue a project challenge at the start of the internship, then follow-up with bi-weekly check-ins and broader critiques each month.  Throughout the process, interns explore insights and receive direction from our seasoned team of designers. The project culminates with a final concept and presentation by the interns to the full LUNAR team. For this project we intentionally left the brief ambiguous and open to interpretation — and Interns Brit Leek and Inder Sachdev took very different approaches as they began their challenge. Brit pulled inspiration from literature and poetry to begin defining what good and evil meant to her, while Inder focused in on the inherit tension at play when an object embodies both good and evil. Brit started her process by pulling imagery that visually represented the moods, colors, shapes, landscapes, animals and other objects that felt good or evil to her, then began asking questions such as “Is good or evil defined by appearance?” For her final concept, Brit moved forward with a literal approach examining functionality as the defining component that determines what makes a product good or evil (as opposed to merely styling to appear “good” or “evil”). …

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LUNAR interns apply their creativity to explore perceptions of “good” and “evil” in objects

What makes a product seem “good” or “evil”?

Our industrial design interns recently completed their Moondust* project, spending the last several months exploring what makes objects seem “good” or, inversely, “evil.” If you’ve been following along, you’ll remember how Moondust works: we issue a project challenge at the start of the internship, then follow-up with bi-weekly check-ins and broader critiques each month.  Throughout the process, interns explore insights and receive direction from our seasoned team of designers. The project culminates with a final concept and presentation by the interns to the full LUNAR team.

For this project we intentionally left the brief ambiguous and open to interpretation — and Interns Brit Leek and Inder Sachdev took very different approaches as they began their challenge.

Brit pulled inspiration from literature and poetry to begin defining what good and evil meant to her, while Inder focused in on the inherit tension at play when an object embodies both good and evil.

Brit's imagery

Brit started her process by pulling imagery that visually represented the moods, colors, shapes, landscapes, animals and other objects that felt good or evil to her, then began asking questions such as “Is good or evil defined by appearance?”

For her final concept, Brit moved forward with a literal approach examining functionality as the defining component that determines what makes a product good or evil (as opposed to merely styling to appear “good” or “evil”).

Brit developed the Good and Evil Floor Cleaning System, which includes a mop that cleans the floor and leaves a beautiful pattern, but inefficiently dries the floor, thus creating an unsafe and potentially dangerous environment.

Good and Evil Floor Cleaning System

Inder instead concentrated on the subjective nature of the theme, and presented the Ripple Shatter Weight, which would bring delicate glass onto a classic weight form that would then “shatter” when stepped on (by projecting an image of broken glass within the weight). Inder’s intent with Ripple was to capture attention and evoke surprise. He also envisioned tying the scale to a mobile application where users could track progress toward their target weight, and as they neared their goal, the weight would shatter less and less.

Ripple Shatter Weight

As with all Moondust projects, these exercises are more about the intern’s journey rather than the final concept – it’s about facilitating a unique exploration experience with the support and guidance from our world-class design team. We urge our interns to be curious and refine their individual perspective to elicit emotional responses.

Stay tuned for news about our next Moondust challenge – coming in early 2014!


* Moondust is an extension of LUNAR Moonshine — an ongoing practice by LUNAR design professionals of original discursive thinking and our unique exploration of creative boundaries to help us better engage with the larger conversation in the design world.

For more info: LUNAR Moondust: Good and Evil Finale

LUNAR > creativity that makes a difference industrial design, product design, engineering design, graphic design, interaction design » Industrial Design

LUNAR Moondust: Good and Evil Finale

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